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Full text of "Negro folk singing games and folk games of the Habitants"

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pegro Folk Singing -Games and 
Folk Games of the Habitants. 



(Curwen's Edition, 5756.) 




Traditional Melodies and Text transcribed by 

GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 

Accompaniments by 

HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 




LONDON : 
J. CURWEN & SONS Ltd., 24 BERNERS STREET, W. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/negrofolksingingOOport_0 



TO THE MEMORY Ol MY MOTHER AND FATHER. 



Negro Folk Singing Games and 
Folk Games of the Habitants. 

(Curwen's Edition, 5756.) 

' 
Traditional Melodies and Text transcribed by 

GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 

Accompaniments by 

HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



LONDON : 
J. CURWEN & SONS Dux, 24 BERNERS STREET, W. 

Copyright, U.S.A., 1914, by Grace Cleveland Porter. 
Price Two Shillings and SixpenceNI ET" 






(in 



3 



a 



FOREWORD. 



SOME of the games in this book were given for the first time 
in Europe, in the spring of 19 13, bv the children of the 
Espérance Guild of Morris Dancers, at Miss Porter's Recital in 
Small Queen's Hall. 

That the book will be an addition to the English folk-art 
books is to my mind assured by the fact that the children loved 
the games and entered into the playing of them with great zest. 

A largfe audience was also delighted with them on their first 
introduction into England, and before many years they will probably 
be known to English children as well as they will be to the 
children of America, and be yet another link with our neighbours 
over the sea. 

MARY NEAL, 
London. lion. Sec, Espérance Guild of Morris Dancers. 

5756 



(ni) 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 

SOME years ago Mr. Henry E. Krehbiel wrote some charming articles 
for the New York Tribune upon Southern Folk Singing-Games, among 
which he included four, " I'm walkin' on the Levee," " King and Queen," 
" I've lost a Partner," and " Turn, Cinnamon, turn." These had been collected 
and given him by Mrs. Louise Clarke-Prynelle. 

These games, played by the " Crackers," a term playfully applied to 
the country folk of Florida, were subsequently given by Mr. Krehbiel to Mr. 
W. W. Newell for his book, " Games and Songs of American Children," 
published by Harper Brothers. 

I wish to express my appreciation to Mr. Krehbiel and Messrs. Harper 
Brothers for their courtesy in allowing me to include this interesting group of 
games in my book. 

The other Southern Singing-Games I transcribed as Mammy sang them 
to me. 

My sincere thanks are due to Miss Mary Neal for her interest in my work 
and in making it possible for the singing games to be so delightfully presented 
by the children of the Espérance Guild of Morris Dancers. 

The enthusiasm, grace, and clever acting of these little people made the 
teaching of the games a delight, and if Mammy Mary could but have been 
present to see the merriment and enthusiastic welcome accorded " We're 
marchin' on dis camp groun'," ' Bounce aroun'," and " Peep, squirrel," 
I'm sure her dear old heart would have rejoiced. 

London. G. C. P. 

5756 



iv) 



PREFACE. 

AMONG the brightest memories of my childhood are the stories my mother used to 
tell me of her own youthful days at " Glenmore," an old plantation in Maryland. 
These stories were sometimes of her parents, sometimes of her brother and little sisters, 
sometimes of the fields, the woods, the open country, or else again of the pets dear to all 
children's hearts. But whatever the subject of the tale, I noticed that one, Mammy 
Mary, was always a central figure, the old coloured nurse whose protecting love and 
devotion seemed as near to my mother then, as it had been in those days long gone by. 

Mammy Mary, who identified herself with every interest of the family, sharing 
in its joys and vicissitudes, was the embodiment of understanding motherly love, and a 
true aristocrat at heart, a type of the old régime that is so rapidly disappearing. This 
tender relationship which existed between the typical old black Mammy and the white 
children she nursed can hardly be understood nowadays without a glimpse into the 
conditions which formed the picturesque, unique life of the plantations in the South before 
the Civil War. 



What fun it was on Saturday afternoons to stand and watch Mammy Betty make 
pralines, those unforgettable sweetmeats that she carefully packed in a little brown straw 
basket, which was taken to church on Sunday mornings to keep the children quiet through 
the long sermon. And the afternoons under the trees when Bible stories were read aloud, 
with Mammy Mary in the group, listening intently to every word! What matter that 
she could not read or write, she knew her Bible by heart ! Mammy's word was law to 
the children who adored her, and the ready sympathy she gave in all their little troubles 
made the bond closer between them. She took a lively interest in all their pets, and when 
any of the pets died they were buried with much ceremony in a ravine, which for some 
unaccountable reason was called " Bunker Hill." 

Little Sisters always dressed for the funeral in long, black skirts trailing 
solemnly behind them. The procession started with Big Brother in the lead as grave- 
digger and Master of Ceremonies, dragging the little wagon in which was placed all that 
remained of the children's pet, and Mammy brought up the rear. On one of these 
occasions a much-loved black kitten was to be buried and had been placed in a paste- 
board box with an elaborate epitaph written on the cover. 

The hymns chosen (evidently quite at random and with small regard to fitness) 
were : " Pull for the Shore! " and " Knocking, knocking, who is there? " 
5756 



In the middle of a short but serious prayer by Oldest Sister, Big Brother burst out 
giggling, the funny side of the whole affair being too much for him (and it wasn't his own 
particular kitten, anyway !), and the whole ceremony came to a sudden end, amid a 
deluge of tears from the others and a sound reprimand from Mammy. 

" Ain' yo' 'shamed of yo'se'f ter mek dem children cry dat-er-way. Ain' yo' got 
no better manners dan dat? Not a cookie does yo' git fer two days fer habin' yo'sef in 
dat onmannerly way, suh! " 

What anxiety Mammy showed during the days when two of the Little Sisters were 
ill ! The doctor's belief in " starving a fever" evidently conflicted with Mammy's own 
ideas to such an extent that one day she was aroused to a high pitch of indignation, 
exclaiming after he had left the room, " Effen yo' does all de doctors tells yo' ter do dey '11 
perish yo', and dat doctor-man is jes' nach'lly starvin' mah blessed chilien ter def, an' 
I'se gwine ter fix 'em a lil' sompin' ter eat " ; for that very day Little Sisters had begged 
for a piece of chicken, and Mammy, with a fixed look of determination in her eye and 
asking no one's advice, crept down to the poultry-yard, picked out a plump broiler, and 
in an unbelievably short time each Little Sister was rapidly devouring her half of the 
chicken, with such relish and delight that Mammy's chuckles could be heard a long way 
off. When the doctor came next morning he was astonished at the decided improvement 
in his patients, and Mammy so faithfully continued her visits to the poultry-yard that in 
a short time the children were well ! 



These are some of the reminiscences that have given me many joy-dreams, and 
a longing to have known the same experience, for I have always felt that I had missed 
something beautiful out of my life in not having known the love of an old Mammy. 

But who is reckless enough to say that some dreams do not come true? At least 
part of mine turned into a wonderful reality, for on a certain day not very many years 
ago I met a really true Mammy of the old régime, who through many different experiences 
had found her way North ! She was an ample, motherly figure in a black dress and apron, 
and I noted the white hair parted evenly in the centre, the kindly eyes that looked into 
mine with a something that one feels is usually the heritage of long understanding. Her 
whole personality conjured up the sweet picture of the " Old South," and I exulted silently 
while joy filled my heart. 

5756 



(vi) 



MAMMY'S STORY. 



Over an almost miracle like this one may earnestly say, 
" Thank God !" And so Mammy came to be our servant, 
and during our many confidential talks we both decided 
it must have been through some special magic that we had 
found each other ! 

What happy times I spent listening to her relating 
stories of the days gone by, and of her " white people " at 
the Great House where they lived and in which she was 
born. (Mammy always laid stress upon having been a 
house servant, not a " field " hand.) 

As she drew the picture of her " ole Mistis " going in 
and out among the negroes on the Plantation, ministering 
to them in sickness, providing their necessary clothing 
and looking generally to their welfare ; in fact, the "Angel 
of the Quarters," I realized that here was but another 
example of that relationship so happily interwoven with 
the picturesque Plantation life of long ago ! 

An' chile, effen yo' jes' could er seen de tarrypin 
pen (you all calls 'em turtles), w'y dem tarrypins wuz as 
thick as thieves, an' w'en de sun shine you could see 'em 
sunnin' dey sèves, an' stickin' dey haids out 'twixt de 

slats. 

W'y, Big Sam (he wuz de cook) could go any time 
an' git one fer ter mek dat tarrypin soup, which effen 
yo' ain' nuvver tase' it, w'y Ian' sakes, Honey, how is I 
gwine 'scribe it to you? Seem lak dey ain' no tarrypins 
nowadays lak de ones we all usen ter hab down in ole 
Georgia ! 

I wuz de nurse fer de chilien, an' in springtime de 
family would go 'bout ten miles down de coast ter de 
Islan'' — Marster John own- — an' spen' 'bout two months. 
Sometime jes fer de fun ob it we'd all go down in de gre't 
big row-boat wot hit took ten men ter row, an' I kin' hear 
'em rite now, a-singin' de song wot dey allers usen ter 
sing w'en dey wuz a-makin' dem oars fly ! An' it's jes' 
lak I'se a-tellin' you, Honey, dat boat jes' nachlly skip 
ober de waves twell fus' t'ing yo' know dey wuz a- pulling 
huh up ter de dock at de islan' ! 

Den w'en summer come 'long we all would drive up 
wid de ca'riages an' hosses, and spen' de nights on de 
way, up ter Marster John's summer home in Vermont. 

But, Honey, hit wuz in de winter time, in dem days 
w'en de vi'lets wuz in bloom an' me an' de chilien usen 
ter hab sich a gran' time a-playin' games. Ring games, 
you say, Honey? W'y bless yo' heart, chile, I wisht I 
had a cent right now fer all de times I done play 'em 
wid de chilien ! 

Seem lak I wuz gifted ob Gawd ter mak' 'em happy, 
an' it want only fer de fun wot dey make 'mongst dey 
blessed HI' sèves, but fer de exercise wot it gib 'em. 

But nowadays dey doan' bodder wid nuffin' lak dat, 
an' now is comin' on de race ob nurses wot doan' know 
how ter behabe dessev'es since Sherman done broke loose 
(dat mean slabery, Honey), an' yo' doan' see de nurses 
nursin' de chilien lak dey usen' ter do ! I tell yo', darlin', 
we ole-time cullud fokes is de royal bloods! 

I was called de head nurse ob de Square in de City 
down whar' I libed in Georgia, an' we nebber usen ter 
class ouise'ves wid all de udder nurses, sep'in' de ones 
wot tek care ob de quality chilien. 

5756 



I usen ter teach 'em de lil * Ring-games, an' when de 
chilien see me comin' 'long, dey jes' nachally dance up 
an' down and come a-runnin' ter me, fer dey knowed dey 
wuz gwine ter hab one good time! Dat dey" did! 

Whar I larnt all des Ring-games, Honey? De good 
Lawd knows ! I alius knowed 'em ; you all calls 'em 
singin' -games, but dat ain' de ole-timey name, Honey ! 
One ob 'em wuz, "Go roun' de 'Sembly," an' dis is jes' 
how we done play it. All de chilien jines han's, an' make 
a big ring, an' go flyin' roun'. singin' : — 

Bounce aroun' to-di-iddy-um, 

to-di-iddy-um, 

to-di-iddy-uni, 
Bounce aroun' to-di-iddy-um, 
Long summer day ! 

Den, de chilien walks aroun' singin' : — 

Go roun' de 'Sembly to-day, 

Go roun' de 'Sembly to-day, 

Go roun' de 'Sembly to-day, 

Long summer day ! 

Den dey start flyin' roun' agin an' singin' : — 

Bounce aroun' to-di-iddy-um, 

to-di-iddy-um, 

to-di-iddy-um, 
Bounce aroun' to-di-iddy-um, 
Long summer day ! 

In de nex' verse dey still keeps hoi ob han's and all 
walks up ter de middle an' stan's tergedder, singin' : — 

Close up de 'Sembly to-day, 

Close up de 'Sembly to-day, 

Close up de 'Sembly to-day, 

Long summer day ! 

Den dey walks backwards ter de place whar de circle wuz 
befo' an' singin' all de time : — 

Open de 'Sembly to-day, 
Open de 'Sembly to-day, 
Open de 'Sembly to-day, 
Long summer day ! 

An' dey end up the game wid : — 

Bounce aroun' to-di-iddly-um, 

to-di-iddly-um, 

to-di-iddly-um, 
Bounce aroun' to-di-iddly-um. 
Long summer day ! 



An' dey go jes' a-flyin' roun' 



It sho' did m ah eyes good fer ter see 'em so happy, 
fer dey wuzn' only enjoyin' dey selves, but dey wuz 
a-gittin' exercise, 'sides de fun. 

'Nudder game dey wuz mighty fond ob wuz " Your 
darlin', my darlin'," or " Peep, Squirrel." De chilien 
form de ling wid two on de outside opposite each udder, 
an' 'all de chilien in de ring hoi' han's an' dance 'roun' 
an' de outside two stan's still an' all sing : — 

Your darlin', my darlin', can't yo' ketch dat Squirrel? 
Your darlin', my darlin', can't yo' ketch dat Squirrel? 

(Right heah de ring stops flyin' roun'.) An' dey all sing — 

Peep, Squirrel, \ ankee doodle dandy, 
Peep, Squirrel, Yankee doodle dandy. 



Vil 



At the wuds " Peep, squirrel," de outside two (what's 
standin' still) tries to peep at each udder, ober de shoulders 
ob de chilien in front ob 'em. At de wuds : — 

Run 'im down, run 'im down, Yankee doodle dandy, 
Run 'im down, run 'im down, Yankee doodle dandy, 
Can't you ketch dat Squirrel? 

one ob de chilien on de outside chases de udder twell he 
ketches 'im, den two udders come out de ring an' tek de 
places ob de fus' two squirrels, an' so de game goes on 
twell dey gits tired an' wants ter play somp'ing else. 

Yas, Honey, wot fun we usen ter hab ! But Lawd-er- 
massy, chile ! lemme go, fer I'll nebber git all dem clo'es 
ironed effen I fools 'long dis-er-way talkin' 'bout dem days 
so long ago ! 

Hoi' on, Honey, I done thought I done disremembered 
dat one ob de " Marchin' Games," but it seem lak it's 
a-comin' back ter ma min'; Lemme-see! Goes sompin' lak 
dis! "We're marchin' on dis camp groun' " (but it didn't 
hab nuffin ter do wid de camps in de wah time). Down on 
yo' knees! Doan' speak fer a minit, chile, jes' lemme 
think, um hum yas ! Now I done got it, de chune an' de 
words bofe ! Heah 'tis.' De chilien march roun' in a ring, 
two by two, arm in arm, singin' : — 

We're marchin' on dis camp groun', 
We're marchin' on dis camp groun', 
We're marchin' on dis camp groun', 
Down on yo' knees! 

Right heah each one bends de left knee ter de groun' (1 
wuz mighty limble in dem days, Honey, an' I usen ter 
ben' ma knees same as de res', but Ian' chile ! de mis'ry 
done ketch me so bad in mah back dat it's all I kin do 
now ter ben' down ter say mah prayers, much less fly 
roun' lak I usen ter do in de chillen's games ! Yassum ! 
an' de udder day I met a lady in de street an' she axed me 
"Howdy"? an' I 'spons, "I'se right po'ly, thank Gawd, 
mistis, I'se done got de mis'ry in mah back, an' w'en 
she axes me wot I mean by dat I sez, skuze me, ma'am, 
but you know wot yo' back is, an' yo' know wot de mis'ry 
is, well effen yo' jes' jines dem two togedder, dat's wot 
I'se got!" Den as I wuz a-tellin' you, Honey, de nex' 
verse goes : — 

I met mah true lub in de fiel', 
I met mah true lub in de fiel', 
I met mah true lub in de fiel', 

Down on yo' knees ! 
Gib huh a kiss, ma honey, ma lub, 

So early in de mornin'. 

Dis heah wuz a kin' ob quiet game, an' I alius usen ter hab 
de chilien play one er dis kind atter dey got hot an' tired 
from playin' de runnin' games, an' it kind er gib 'em a 
lil' res'. But, Honey, dey doan' seem ter be no one now-a- 
days ter tek de lead in dese heah games lak we played 'em 
in dem good ole times befo' de wah ! 

An' now I'se bin a-losin' all dis time fum mah wuk an' 
effen I doan' make has'e an' g'long, dem irons '11 be so 
hot dey'll sco'ch up all de clo'es. I'll tell yo' some mo' 
games anudder time, darlin'. 

Her dear old face was luminous with memories of 
far-away days of her youth, as smiling and curtseying her 
way out of the room, she said, " Yas, Baby, look lak 
Gawd jes' gifted me ter mek dem chilien happy ! " 

I shall never forget how the next day, as I sat at my 
desk, Mammy came hunying up the stairs with the glad 
news, " Heah's anudder ring-game I jes' thought ob Honey, 
whilst I was mixin' up mah light bread. I'se so happy, an' 

5756 



den ergin mah mis'ry' s some better, an' I kin git roun' 
right tol'able to-day, thank Gawd ! De game is calle 1 
' Fly roun', young ladies, fly roun' ! ' an' it goes lak 
dis;" and away went Mammy, to my delight, flying 
around the room, singing and then bowing and smiling 
the while she described the way the game was played. 

You see, Honey, de boys an' girls form de ring (dey 
ain't no one in dc middle dis time), an' dey all tek hoi' er 
han's an' go dancin' roun' an' singin' :— 

Fly roun', fly roun', young ladies, fly roun', fly roun', 
Fly roun', fly roun', young ladies, fly roun', fly roun', 
If you can't fly, I'll fly myself, 
Fly roun, fly roun'. 

Wen dey git ter de nex' words, " Honour yo' partner," 
dey all stop still an' let go han's, an' w'en dey say, " Make 
yo' obedient," de girls all curtsey and de boys make a bow, 
fus' ter de one on de right han', then ter de one on de lcf, 
den dey go dancin' roun' singin' :— 

Fly roun', fly roun', young ladies. 

One ob de games we usen ter lub ter play wasn' a ring- 
game, it didn' hab no chune, but it wuz a heap ob fun, 
I kin tell you, Honey, but it had a pow'ful queer soundh' 
name, " Madam, Hoop-er-de-crop." 

AU de chilien dey'd line up on one side wid one ob 'em 
fer de leader, an' 'bout twenty-five feet away, one chile 
would stan' alone, facin' de res'. Dis chile walks ter de 
crowd ob chilien, sayin' ober an' ober agin dese words : 
Madam, /joo/>-er-de-crop," an' 'ebry time de chile git 
ter de word " hoop," she ben' down wid one knee twell 
she mos' tech de groun', an' ebry time she say dat funny 
name, ebry chile call out, " Answer, madam ! " Dey keep 
dis heah up twell de one chile gits up close ter de leader 
an' say, " Mister sent me ter buy a sheep ! " Den de 
leader axes, " Whar's de one yo' carry?" Den de chile 
say, " It got away fum me an' I can't fin' it! " An' den 
de leader say, " Take one an' carry it an' hop on your 
ten toe ; " at dis de chile teks one ob de udder chilien by 
de han' an' dey bofe hop back ter de udder side. Dey 
keeps dis up untwell all de chilien an' de leader too is 
done hopped ober ; den de chile wot say in de beginnin' 
" Madam, hoop-er-de-crop," she call out, " Scatter, sheep," 
an' dey all run, an' den dey play it ober agin ! 

Dere's one t'ing wot ebry chile does, I reckon, an' we 
all usen ter do it, w'en we'd play de " count-out " games, 
I mean by dat, Honey, we'd count out ter see which chile 
was gwine ter be in de middle, an' dish heah is de rhyme 
wot we usen ter say : — 

One-er-mah-ury, 

Dickcry-seben 

Haller-bone, cracker-bone 

Ten or 'leben ! 

Peep-o ! mus' be done ; 

Twiggle-twagglc 

Twenty-one ! 

Last cbenin', Honey, wen I wuz a-settin' on de po'ch 
in ma rockin' cheer, a-stedyin' 'bout de days we'n I wuz 
a young gal, dere cum ter mah min' one ob de ring-games 
wot wuz a gr'et favourite 'mongst de chilien ; it wuz :— 

Come, mah little darlin', 

An' take a walk wid me, 

Down in de valley where all de lilies grow, 

Dere are sweet pinks ami roses, strawberries on de vine; 

Rise up, an' choose de one dat's suitable to yo' min'. 

De chilien form a tin;;, wid one in tie middle, an' walk 
aroun' singin'. an' w'en dey cum ter de words, " Rise up 
an' choose de one dat's suitable to yo' min'." de ring 



( viii 



stan' still an' de one wot's in de middle chooses a partner, 
an' dis one in turn takes de place in de middle an' de fus' 
chile jines in de ring, an' den begins de song ober ergin. 

Wen I larnt dat game, Honey? De Lawd knows, I 
alius knowed it, yas Baby, dat's de chune an' de words! 

But, chile, ain I nebber tôle yo' de story ob de " Talkin' 
Cat-fish " ? Mah Mammy done tole me dat eber since I wuz 
a lil' chile, yas, Honey, one of dem days long time ago, 
dey wuz a man wot went a-fishin' an' he cotch one er dese 
heah cat-fish, an' whilst he wuz a-bringin' 'im home, de 
fish 'gun ter talk, an' hit's jes' lak I'se a-tellin' yo' ; an' fus' 
de man git kinder skeered, an' den he 'gin ter git biggity 
ober habin ketched a talkin' fish, an' he went off ter git 
all his fren's ter cum an' heah dat wonnerful fish! So he 
tie 'im up in a bag, an' lef 'im on de ribber-bank twell he 
gits back. Presen'ly some chilien cum 'long an' de fish 
he holler outen de bag an' say dat a man done tie 'im up 
an' fixin' fer ter kill 'im; he say effen de chilien let 'im out 
an' th'ow 'im back in de water he'll sing 'em a song! So 
de chilien dey think dat'll be mighty fine ter heah a fish 
sing, an' so dey ontie de bag jes' lak de fish ax 'em, an 
he jump in de water, an' den he sing dis heah lil' song : — 

" Pirra-pim-pim — Yerra-doe, 
Pirra-pim-pim — Yerra-doe, 
Pirra-pim-pim — Gone ! 
Pirra-pim-pim — Gone de bushes, 
Pirra-pim-pim — Yamip !" 

An', Honey, wid dat las' word de fish he make fer de 
bottom ob de ribber swimmin' 'way fas' as ebber he kin! 
De chilien call an' call an' call fer de lil' fish ter cum back, 
but ump-um! de lil' fish he ain' payin' no 'tenshun, an' den 
de chilien dey 'member 'bout de man wot' ketch de fish, 
an' dey 'gin ter git skeered an' feared he'll cum back and 
ketch dem ! So dey git some ole glass bottles ter put in de 
bag an' tie it up, an' den dey jes' nach'lly put out fer 
home fas' as dere laigs kin carry 'em. 

Yas, chile, dat dey did! Press'nly heah cum Mr. Man 
back ergin wid a whole passel er fokes ter lissen ter de 
wunnerful talkin' cat-fish! 

Mr. Man, he feel mighty proud, an' he call out, "Sing, 
mah Mammy, Daddy sing! " an' he shake de bag an' de 
glass ansah back, " Ching-a-ling-ching! " an' de fokes dey 
wuz so mad at de man fer foolin' 'em, dat dey 'gun fer 
ter beat 'im, an' he hatter jes' nach'lly run fer his life! 
An', Honey, ter dis ve'y day, hits jes' lak I'se tellin' yo 
ev'y time yo' see a cat-fish jump up out'n de watah an' 
back ergin, yo' heah 'im go, " Yar-rup! " 

Yas, Honey, in dem days one of de ring-games was 
" De Queen ob Englan'." Hit wuz pow'ful hard ter choose 
'mongst all de lil' girls fer one ob 'em ter be de Queen in 
de game, fer dey was all so pretty an' sweet and look lak 
so many flowers, dat de onies way fer ter do wuz ter 
" count out." I done tole yo' dat countin'-out rhyme 
dat begin "One-a-ma-ury-dickery-seben" ; an' soon as 
dey count all de chilien out, de las' one she's de Queen! 

Dis heah is a game jes' fer de girls, so de boys jes' 
hatter wait twell dey git th'oo! Dey make de ring an' 
march roun' de Queen wot's settin' on a chair in de middle, 
an' dey commence fer ter sing, " Oh, set de Queen ob 
Englan' in her chair." 

"She hab los' all de true love she had las' year, 
Rise upon yo' feet an' kiss de one yo' meet, 
Dere's a-many aroun' yo' chair." 

At de words, " Rise upon yo' feet," de ring stan' still, 
de Queen stan's up, an' chooses one ob de girls in de ring 

5756 



an' kisses her, an' leads huh to de chair while dey sing de 
res' ob de verse. Dey keep dis up twell all de lil' gLls 
have a chance ter be de ''Queen." 

One time whilst we wuz in de middle ob playin' de ring 
games, one ob mah lil' white chilien I wuz nursin' got mad 
wid one ob de udder chilien an' went off by hisse' f, an' he 
pout, an' won' speak ter enny one or jine in de ring, an' I 
stops de game an' I sez, " Charles Alexander, I'se gwine 
tell yo' Ma," an' he ac' lak he doan' eben heah me, den I 
sez, "Charles Alexander, effen yo' doan' come, I'se gwine 
tell yo' Gran'-ma," but dat chile doan' nebber pay no 
'tenshun 'tall ; an' fer de las' time I calls out, " Charles 
Alexander, I gwine tell yo' Pa." " I'se comin', Mammy!" 
he say, fer dat las' 'nouncement sho did fotch 'im, cos 
Marster wuz mighty strict wid his chilien, an' Charles 
Alexander warn't gwine ter take no chances, dat he warn't! 

But, Honey, I wuz so busy a-tellin' yo' 'bouten dat boy 
dat I clean fergot ter 'scribe de game we wuz a-playin' 
dat time. "I los' mah Mistis' dairy key, Im in dis lady's 
garden, Do, do let me out, I'm in dis lady's garden," 
urn, hum. Now hum 'long wid me, Honey, dat's right, 
now yo' got de chune! Den, as I wuz a-sayin', " I los' mah 
Mistis' dairy key, I'm in dis lady's garden," de chilien 
form de ring all holdin' han's an' dey pert end dat in de 
middle ob de ring is a garden wid one ob de chilien walkin' 
roun' and all commence ter sing :• — 

"I los' mah Mistis' dairy key, 
I'm in dis lady's garden, 
Do, do let me out, 

I'm in dis lady's garden." 

When dey gits ter de words, " Do, do let me out," de chile 
in de middle tries to break thoo de ring or slip under- 
neath, den ef he doan' git out dey all sing ergin : — 

"A brass key an' a silver lock, 
I'm in dis lady's garden, 
Do, do let me out, 

I'm in dis lady's garden." 

An' by dis time de chile in de middle mos' generally gits 
thoo de ring an' anudder chile takes his place. 

Sometimes when de chilien usen ter git tired I set 
down wid 'em on de grass under a gre't big shade tree, 
an' tell 'em stories, an' one dey wuz powerful fond uv wuz 
" Ran-tan-tony," an' hits jes' lak I'se a-tellin' you ; one 
time all de rats wuz a-playin' in a' em'ty house, habin' a 
fine time 'mongst dey se'ves as peaceable as could be, 
w'en Mister Man, he cum 'long an' say, " Brer Rat, ebber 
see trouble? " an' Brer Rat, he up an' say, " No!" An' 
de man ax, " Brer Rat, does yo' want ter see trouble? " 
An' Brer' Rat he say, " Yas, ob course we want ter see 
trouble, we ain' nebber heard ob it befo', an' we' s allers 
glad ter see somepin new." So Mister Man went off an' 
all de rats wuz jes' dat pleased a-thinkin' dey wuz a-gwine 
ter see sump'n nice dat dey went roun' dancin' on deir 
nine laigs, an' a-singin' : — 

• ■ Ran-tan-tony, see Trouble to-day, 
Ran-tan-tony, see Trouble to-day." 

Wen dey wuz in de middle ob dese heah carryin's on, 
Mister Man he cum back wid a bag, an' he 'low, " Brer' 
Rat, yo' say yo' nebber see trouble, well here it is, an' 
with dat he opened de bag and out jumps a lot er cals 
an' dey tuk atter dem po' rats fas' as dey could! Sech 
a squealin' an' a-scatteration yo' nebber did see. Honey, 
dey jes' run fer dey lives, an' de way dem cats pounce on 
de rats an' chase 'em and eat 'em wuz scan'a'lous ! Dat 
it wuz! An' I kin tell yo', chile, "Ran-tan-tony" sho' did 
see trouble dat day! 



(ix) 



Some few ob de rats got away, part of 'em run inter 
de walls, part ob 'em went under de house, an' some jes' 
nach'lly put fer de woods lak de debbil hisself was a-running 
uv 'em! An' ter dis very day, Honey, you'll find rats in 
dem three places, in de walls, under de house, an' in de 
woods ; an' hits jas' lak I'se a-tellin', on dat day w'en dey 
all wuz a-singin' " Ran-tan-tony, see Trouble to-day," 
was de time de cats done got dere fus' taste fer rats, an' 
dey done kip up dat same likin' ter dis very day! An' 
dat's a fact! 

Dere's a game dat de " Crackers" in Florida likes ter 
play, an' dey calls it "I'm walkin' on the Levee." Yo' know 
what de Levee means, don't you, Honey? Hits wot dey 
calls de 'bankment 'long side de ribbers whar' dey piles 
de steam-boat freight. All de chilien jine in a ring, wid 
one in de middle, an' walk 'roun' an' sing : — 

"I'm walkin' on the Levee, 
I'm walkin' on the Levee, 
I'm walkin' on the Levee, 
For yo' hab gained de day." 



An' w'en dey sing 



■ Run in and out ob de windows, 
Run in and out ob de windows, 
Run in and out ob de windows, 
For yo' hab gained de day," 



Summit, New Jersey, U.S.A. 



de chilien in de ring all holdin' ban's raises 'em up high 
an' de middle chile runs in and out twell dat verse is done, 
den as dey sing " stan' up an' face yo' lover," do chile in 
de middle stan's in front ob de one he likes best an' bows, 
an' she curtseys, and den w'en dey sing, " I measun- 
my love to show you," de boy th'ows his arms mil Pom 
his heart ter measure jes' as fur as he kin! an' keeps dis 
up ter de en' ob de verse, den de boy he sing, " Mah heart 
an' han' I'll gib yo'," and w'en he gits ter de wuds " fo' 
yo' hab gained de day," he takes his HI' partner by de 
han' an' leads huh ter de middle ob de ring ; den at de 
nex' verse he kneels in front ob huh, keepin' hoi' ob huh 
han' all de time, singin' " I kneel because I love yo', fo' 
yo' hab gained de day," an' wid dese las' wuds he leabes 
huh an' jines de ring ergin, an' dar his lil' partner stan's 
all by huh se'f, whilst de boy, wid his han' on his heart an' 
tryin' ter look sad, sings de las' verse, "It breaks mah 
heart ter leabe yo', fo' yo' hab gained de day," but w'en 
de chilien gits ter dis verse dey gener'ly giggles out loud! 
An' as I ses, Honey, hits a heap better ter laugh dan cry, 
effen yo' is got ter leabe enny one! 

Why, bless gracious Baby, I know dat bread ob mine 
is done riz an' I'se gotter go 'long an' fix it or yo' won' 
hab enny hot rolls fer supper, so good-bye, darlin', an' off 
Mammy went singing, " It breaks my heart to leabe yo', 
for yo' hab gained de day." 

Grace Cleveland Porter. 



"BRER' RABBIT" TRADITIONAL GAME 

AND DANCE. 



From a Plantation in Mississippi, U.S.A. 



The Mississippi negroes have an interesting tradition 
that on every moonlight night the rabbits come out and 
hold a conclave. " Brer' Rabbit " sits on the top of a 
grassy mound, while the other rabbits form in rings around 
him, and soon their dance begins. The negroes on moon- 
light nights try to imitate the rabbits and seem to feel 
for the time being that they are real live bunnies! They 
all squat down, about a dozen or more in a circle, and 
puffing out their cheeks, slap them with their hands, the per- 
cussion making a peculiar popping sound, while at the same 
time they all squeal like a young rabbit in pain, and one 
and all jump up and down, hopping like Brer' Rabbit. 



The players in the game go in and out and around each 
other, keeping in the form of a circle all the while. They 
next stoop down on all fours, sway to and fro, and when 
that is over they stand up and lift one hand and foot in 
the air, while hopping and jumping on the other foot, 
squealing and making this continual popping sound as 
described before. Then crossing their hands under them, 
some of them hop on both feet, the rest hop on just one 
foot with the other foot extended forward in the air, 
keeping up this queer squealing and slapping the cheeks. 
They one and all dance and play till they are completely 
exhausted, and have to be picked up and carried away. 



[Secured for me by my friend, Jean Cathcart of Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.A.] 



57S 6 



U 



GLIMPSES ALONG THE ROADSIDE IN A 

HABITANT VILLAGE. 



Away over the borderland that separates the United 
States from Canada, lies a most fascinating country, the 
home of the French-Canadian Habitant, " Jean Bateese," 
as he is called, just as we speak of Uncle Sam or John Bull. 

The Habitant, who in effect is the peasant farmer of 
the reign of Louis XIV, was transplanted several hundred 
years ago from Brittany and Normandy into the Province 
of Quebec, where he has lived ever since, very much as his 
ancestors have done, clinging to the traditions, singing the 
charming old folk-songs and games, telling the fireside 
stories, and relating the superstitions of centuries. 

And here in the remote parishes you will find families 
living upon the same land their ancestors accepted in 
feudal tenure from the first Seigneurs of "La Nouvelle 
France." 

Many of the picturesque Habitant villages are to be 
found on the beautiful St. Lawrence River, where the 
louses line the road at the top of the narrow farms which 
:xtend down to the river bank, the arrangement carrying 
>ut the idea upon which the first settlements were formed, 
giving every advantage of the water front. 

This system made easy communication possible in the 
pioneer days of the Colonies, the river lending itself as a 
highway in summer for canoeing, and in winter time for 
sleighing. The farms being closely connected, thus proved 
an excellent bulwark against the Indians, who in their 
warfare followed the course of the rivers, and the settlers 
giving the alarm down the line, could help to protect each 
other against their enemies. 

This beautiful and fertile country is really typical of 
French-Canada, and here Jean Bateese and his wife work 
side by side in the field ; she also does the spinning and 
weaving of the linen and home-spun for the family, making 
her own dyes that are altogether charming in colouring. 
The children, too, share in the work of the farm, and quite 
an important member of the Habitant family is the large 
dog, who does his portion of the labour as well as the rest, 
for the wagon that he draws carries bags of flour from the 
mill, and in haying time he is kept busy dragging loads of 
hay across the field. 

The hospitality and kindness one finds among these 
dear people is heart-warming, and I became very much 
attached to them during my stay in their midst, and felt 
that I was among friends. It was four years ago, and two 
of them have written me constantly since then, always 
with the assurance of a warm welcome that awaits my 
return. 

One day as I was wandering along I noticed a little 
house some distance back from the road, and seeing madame 
in the garden I ventured to stop and talk across the rainbow- 
coloured mass of flowers where she was weeding. Leaving 
the weeds to take care of themselves she came to the gate 
and invited me to the house, which was 250 years old, and 
I was ushered into the living-room (kitchen and dining-room 
combined), and here the great iron kettle hung in the big 
open fireplace, and when the fire was out and the ashes 
cool the pet dog burrowed down among them and went 
to sleep. 

5756 



On seeing me the children quickly gathered, for a visitor 
is always full of interest to them, and when I asked to see 
the baby (it is quite safe to do this, as there always seems 
to be a very youngest!) Louis Napoleon, was proudly 
exhibited, a sturdy, brown-eyed little fellow of nine months, 
and before long Onésime came running up, and I found 
much to my delight that he was the little friend who 
the day before had come to help me when I had lost 
the way. He, too, seemed very happy to have found me 
again ! 

I had brought marbles for the boys and brightly- 
coloured beads with needles and waxed thread for the 
girls, who began at once to string necklaces for themselves. 
When I asked them if they knew any games they were 
delightfully responsive, and without embarrassment began 
to play several charming folk singing-games for me. 

One of them, "L'Hirondelle," which means "The 
Swallow," is played somewhat like our American game 
of " Drop the handkerchief." Then another charming 
game is called " La Bastringue," which I first heard sung 
in the Canadian forest at Camp Perthuis, one of the old 
Seigneuries which has come down from the days of the 
Grand Monarque. "La Bastringue" is one of the oldest 
folk singing-games in Canada, and is amusing as well as 
interesting. A ring is formed with two children in the 
centre, a Cavalier and a Maiden, with whom he begs to 
dance "La Bastringue," which is just about to commence. 
He makes his request with marked ceremony, bowing 
low several times with his hand on his heart, but at this 
juncture occurs a child- tragedy, for the little maiden 
of his choice woefully embarrassed and disappointed, 
thanks her partner over and over again, but is obliged to 
make the mortifying reply that it is impossible to accept 
his invitation as she has no slippers! 

Another game which is most unusual and interesting, 
is "Il n'y a qu'un seul Dieu" ("There is but one God "), 
and as the children played and sang I was impressed by 
its similarity with one of our old nursery rhymes, " The 
House that Jack built," in which after each verse the 
previous verse is also added just as if it were a new stepping 
stone each time. This folk singing-game has been played 
since the fifth century. When the missionaries went to 
evangelize Gaul they found that the people used to play 
singing-games in their heathen worship, and in order to 
make Christianity seem easier to them they changed the 
words of the games so as to bring in as far as possible the 
chief Christian mysteries, and the game the little French- 
Canadian children played for me that day was one of these 
very games played fourteen hundred years ago. It is 
called " Il n'y a qu'un seul Dieu " (" There is but one 
God"). 

The children form a ring (no child in the centre) and 
join hands, walking round and singing twice, " There is 
but one God," then comes the question, " Tell me why 
there is one? " and this is twice repeated. Twelve verses 
are sung, and after each verse comes the affirmation, 
" There is but one God," and the question, " Tell me why 
there are two? " and the answer, "There are two Testa- 
ments," and so on. This same affirmation and the question 



( xi ï 



and answers are carried throughout the twelve verses, 
continuing : — 

' There are Three Persons in God. 
There are four Evangelists. 
Moses' books reckon live. 
Water turned to wine in six jars at Cana in Galilee." 

In this verse, which is sung very slowly and impres- 
sively, the children stop walking around, drop hands and 
curtsey towards the centre, then to their neighbours on 
each side. 

At the beginning of the seventh verse the children hold 
hands again, and walk round singing the rest of the verses, 
viz. : — 

" There are seven Sacraments. 
There are eight Beatitudes. 
There are nine angel choirs. 
The Commandments number ten. 
Eleven thousand virgin martyrs. 
The Apostles number twelve." 

After the games were over, and we were sipping our 
raspberry vinegar, madame asked if I would like to see 
the week's baking, and there on the table were twenty-six 
snowy loaves of bread just ready to be put into the oven, 
and such a mysterious looking oven too! not built in the 
house, but out on the roadside near by. This oven, which 
is also used by the neighbours, is of brick and cement, 
with an iron door, and some time before the bread is 
ready for baking, a wood fire is kindled and fed until the 
interior becomes very, very hot, the ashes are then taken 
out and the pans of bread, which are placed on a little flat 
board at the end of a long pole, are put in one by one and 
the door closed until the bread is baked. 

Finding how interested I was in all household details, 
madame ventured that perhaps I might like to go en haut 
(upstairs), and on expressing my pleasure she led the way 
and opened the trap-door, to which was attached a long 
thick rope with a very heavy iron weight on the end, and 

Summit, N. J., U.S.A. 

5756 



up the steep stairway we went step by step till the » 
was reached, and oh! such an interesting big garret it 
was! The family loom, which was three bundled years 
old, stood by the window, the wood polished ai,d worn 
by time was of a soft brown colour, and there o-. the 
well-worn log-bench the busy toiler in each geiK'iatii>n, 
year in and year out, had woven the home-spun for her 
family. On the rafters hung catalagne (rag carpei), rolls 
of linen and dresses, which were carefully hung in linen 
bags ; on the floor were bottes sauvages (long boots without 
heels, made of raw hide, and fashioned somewhat on the 
graceful lines of the sabot), snow-shoes, harnesses, a pile 
of oats, chairs, spinning-wheels, and last, but not least, 
in a corner where the boys and girls I know would have 
been tempted to stay for an indefinite length of time, 
were boxes of delicious maple sugar packed away for winter 
use. 

By good fortune I was to see a picture which I can 
never forget, for it happened that the mother of madame 
was at work at the loom weaving a bed-spread of dark 
blue wool and white linen, which was fashioned into small 
squares as the shuttle flashed back and forth. The sun 
flooding through the little window glorified the worker 
and her work, and we could hear her humming one of the 
old Canadian songs. 

As I was saying good-bye, Onésime disappeared for a 
few moments, quickly returning with a great armful of 
exquisite hollyhocks for me, and madame, with all the 
charm and graciousness so typical of her race, assured me 
that a warm welcome was always ready when I chose to 
come — "Quel plaisir que votre visite, Mademoiselle revenez 
bien souvent! " and as I walked down the road I saw the 
father of madame coming across the field carrying his scythe, 
and as he neared the house I noticed that he looked towards 
the little window where he knew the old wife was at the 
loom, and faintly in the distance a strain of the Canadian 
love-song he was singing was wafted to me, " 11 y a long- 
temps que j'e t'aime, jamais j'e ne t'oublierai" ("It is 
long that I have loved thee, never will I forget thee "). 

G. C. P. 




5756 



The home of a French-Canadian habitant. 



xii ) 



CONTENTS. 

Textual. 



PAGE 

ii 
iii 
iv 
vi 



FOREWORD 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

PREFACE 

MAMMY'S STORY 

BRER' RABBIT. Game and Dance (without music) ... ix 

GLIMPSES ALONG THE ROADSIDE IN A HABITANT 
VILLAGE 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



x 

xiii 



Singing-Games. 

MARCHIN' ON DIS CAMP GROUN' i 

YOUR DARLIN', MY DARLIN' 4 

DE QUEEN OB ENGLAN' 6 

I'M WALKIN' ON THE LEVEE* 8 

I LOS' MAH MISTIS' DAIRY KEY 10 

BOUNCE AROUN' 12 

COME, MAH LITTLE DARLIN' 14 

FLY ROUN' 16 

THE NEEDLE'S EYE 18 

MAH HEART'S GONE AWAY TO LOOSIANA ... 20 

TURN, CINNAMON, TURN 22 

KING AND QUEEN 24 

I'VE LOST A PARTNER • 27 

LA BASTRINGUE 28 

L'HIRONDELLE (The Swallow) ...32 

IL N'Y A QU'UN SEUL DIEU (There is cut one God) 34 

* Pronounced Levy. 
5756 



xin 





Le Bonhomme. 



My little friend, Onésime. 




This is the dog that dragged the load. 



5756 



(xiv ) 





Putting in the last loaf. 



Playing horse. 




De lady, she wears a pretty green shawl." 

(From "'Marchin' on dis camp groun'.") 



5756 



XV 




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"Down on yo' knees!" 

(From " Marchin' on dis camp groun' 









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(From "Marchin* on dis camp groun\") 



5756 



XVI 




Peep, squirrel, peep, squirrel, Yankee doodle dandy." 

(From "Your darlin', my darlin'.") 




I measure my love to show you." 

(From "I'm walking on the levee.") 



5756 



xvii ) 




My heart and hand I'll give you." 

(From "I'm walking on the levee. ") 




"Close up dc 'Sembly." 

(From " Bounce aroun'.") 



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"Honor yo' partner, mek yo' obedient." 

(From "Fly roun', young ladies.") 




"That lady's a rockin' her sugar-lump, O turn, cinnamon, turn." 

(From "Turn, cinnamon, turn.") 



5756 




"Fair demoiselle, wilt thou dance with me? 

(From "La Bastringue.") 




How should a bare-footed maiden appear, 
In the maze of the dance with a gay cavalier? 
(From "La Bastringue." 



S75 6 



MARCHIN' on dis camp groun'. 

Southern Folk-tune. 

Children choose partners, walk arm in arm. behind each other, forming a circle as they march. At t/<ords - 
"Down on y o' knees" each child drops on one knee for an instant. At words -"De lady she wears a pretty green 
shawl" the children pretend coquettishly to wrap a shawl around their shoulders. The lines: "J es' gib her a 
kiss, mah honey, mah love" and "Je s' gib her anudder, ma h honey, mah love" are carried out realistically. 



Traditional Melody and Text 

transcribed by 

GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 



Harmonized by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS 



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The refrain is repeated after each verse excepl the first, 
as verse 2 has the same melody and arrompt. as the refrain. 



CUr^X EN 



YOUR DARLIN,' MY DARLIN.' 



Southern Folk-tune. 

• * * • 

Circle is formed, two children standing opposite each other outside the ring thus- ; ". 
During the first verse all v)alk round singing (the ttvo outside "squirrels" standing still). At words— "•....* 
"Peep, squirrel,' the circle stands still and the tvjo squirrels peep at each other over the shoulders of the chil- 
dren behind whom they are standing. At the words- Run 'im down,' through to the end of the verse, one of the 
squirrels pursues the other until caught. The one caught then joins the circle, the pursuer curtseying to an- 
other child, who in turn becomes one of the outside squirrels and the game continues . 



Traditional Melody and Text transcribed by 
GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 



Harmonized by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



Fast. 




im 



3E 



VOICE. 



Key G. ( S 
Your 



— I m :d s 

dar - lin' my 



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Peep, squir - rel, peep, squir - re 



1 1 m : — . m I r : r 

Cant yo' ketch dat 



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squir- rel? 



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Repeat only when playing the game. 




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Yan - kee Doo - die Dan 

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Run 'im down , 



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5756 



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Yan - kee Doo - die Dan - dy! 



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Run 'im down, 



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run ' im down 




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{ I d . r : m . d I r :d Im : - . m I r : r Id.d: 

Yan -kee Doo- die Dan - dy ! Can't yo' ketch dat squir-rel? 



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ClIR^l^N 



6 

DE QUEEN OB ENGLAN! 

Southern Folk-tune. 

The children form a circle, with one of their number sitting on a chair in the centre as Queen. They 
hold hands and walk around her, singing. At the words "Rise upon y o' feet" the children stand still, the 
Queen rises and choosing, the one she likes best curtseys to her, the chosen one returning the curtsey. 
The Queen then with much dignity conducts her successor to the'throne" The game is kept up until all 
the children in the ring have had a chance to be Queen. 



Traditional Melody and Text transcribed by 
GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 



Harmonized by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS 



VOICE. 



PIANO. 



Slowly 




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all de true 



: m . r Id : r I m 
love she had - las' year-, 



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Rise up-on yo' feet,. 



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5756 



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|ll, .,1,:1, .1, Id 

kiss de one yo' meet- 



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Dere's a - ma-ny a-roun' yo' chair.. 




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5750 



CUKv\ EN 



8 



I'M walkin' on the levee, 



Florida Folk- singing Game. 



Levee' is a term applied in the Middle West atid South of the U?iited States to that portion of a rivers 
bank upon which steamboat freight is piled . 

In commencing the game the players, boys and girls, form a ring with a lad in the ce?itre. W7ien sing- 
ing the first verse they clasp hands and move round. At the second verse the ring stands still, while the 
one in the centre winds in and out under the clasped hands of the singers, which are raised for that pur- 
pose. At the third verse the centre player chooses a partner (a girl) and the two stand facing each other. 
During the fourth verse he puts his hands together then throws them apart, the distance between them in- 
dicating the extent of his affection — "Jis' 'cor din' to his love" as the Crackers say. At the fifth verse he 
places his hand on his heart and then extends it towards the girl, repeating the gesture in time to the 
music until the refrain For you have gaified the day,' when he leads her to the centre of the ring . 
At the beginning of the sixth verse he kneels before her, still holding her hand, but at the end, leaves 
her and takes his place in the ring. During the seventh verse the girl remains alone in the ring. The 
song is then resumed from the begi?ining, and the girl chooses her lover among the boys. 



Traditional Folk- singing Game. 
Collected by LOUISE CLARKE -PRYNELLE. 
for HENRY E. KREHBIEL. 



Harmonized by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 




Moderato ed espressivo, 



P 



ÉHÉ 



VOICE. 



Ê 



rr 

s, 



PIANO. 



Moderato ed espressivo 



Key G. i : S, 

1. I'm 

2. Run 
3 . Stand 

4. I 

5. My 

6. I 

7. It 



: m 



in 

and 
and 



walk 

in 

up 

meas-ure my 
heart and 
kneel be 
breaks mv 



I m 

on 

out 

face 

love 

hand 

cause 

heart 



:- .m 

the 

of the 

your 

to 

I'll 

I 

to 




5756 



From Games and Songs of American Children, composed and compiled by William Wells Newell. 
Copyright, 1883, 1903, by Harper and Brothers. Copyright, 1911, by Robert B. Stone. 



CUKsXEN 



9 



ÊÉ^É 



|l m .r 

Le -vee, 

win-dows, 
lov - er, 
show you, 
give you, 
love you, 
leave you, 




— «r— 
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I'm 
Run 

Stand 

I 

My 

I 
It 



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I r 

"walk - 
in 
up 
meas-ure 
heart 
kneel 
breaks 



in' 

and 

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my 

and 

be 

my 



^ 



on 

out 

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love 

hand 

cause 

heart 



"tr- 



of 



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the 
the 
your 
to 
I'll 
I 
to 



Ir .d :- 

Le -vee, 
win -dows, 

lov - er, 
show you, 
give you, 
love you , 
leave you, 



é 



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I sempre legato > 



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I'm 

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Stand 

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love 

hand 

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heart 



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the 

of the 

your 

to 

I'll 

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s .f :- 

Le -vee, 
win-dows, 

lov-er, 
show you, 
give you, 
love you, 
leave you, 



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For 
For 
For 
For 
For 
For 
For 




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you 

you 
you 
you 
you 
you 
you 



:— .r I m 

have gained 

have gained 

have gained 

have gained 

have gained 

have gained 

have gained 



:- .r 



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the day. 

the day. 

the day. 

the day. 

the day. 

the day. 

the day. 



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5"56 



CURgEN 



10 



I LOS' MAH MISTIS' DAIRY KEY. 

Southern Folk-tune. 



IS 



The children form a circle with one of their nu?nber in the centre (the garden). They walk round hold- 
ing hands and singing until the words "Do, do, let me out" when the one in the middle tries to break through 
or slip underneath. If he succeeds in this, the circle breaks up and all the children chase him. When caught, 
the game begins again. If, however, he does not succeed in breaking through after the first verse, the second 
verse is sung and usually after this he can make his escape and another child takes his place in the centre. 



Traditional Melody and Text 

transcribed by 

GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 



Harmonized by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS 



I 



Fast. 




VOICE. 



fe=a 



S 



Key Ek 



In the manner of a banjo. 



: d 

1. I 

2. A 

3. — 



I m : 8 

los 1 mah 

brass key 

Corn stalk 



33 



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Il s 

dair 

sil 
shoe 



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ver 

string 



key, 

lock, 

bow, 



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I'm 
Ik 
lb 



m 
in 
in 



:s 

dis 
dis 

dis 



i s 

la 
la 
la 



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dy's 
dy\5 
dy's 



I s 

gar 
gar 
gar 



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den, 
den, 



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5756 



CURJ r EN 



li 



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ild' :- Id' 



Id :- Id 




:-ls : m Id :r I m 

Do, do let me out, I'm in dis la - dy's gar den 

Do, do let me out, I'm in dis la - dy's gar 

Do, do let me out, I'm in dis la - dy's gar 

k J r) | J . S i ! T~ — : Q= =H== 



den. 

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5756 



CUR^TN 



12 



BOUNCE AROUN. 

Southern Folk-tune. 



Players form a circle (no one in centre). During first verse "Bounce arourf todi-iddyum' they hold hands 
and skip round as fast as they ca?i. During second verse "Go roun' de sembly" they walk demurely rourtd. 
Then, they start flying around again . repeating the first verse, "Bounce around At 'Close up de 'semôly" all 
walk toward the centre and form a compact group, hands being held up high. During fourth verse the 
ring widens out once more to original size, and the first verse Bounce aroun'" is repealed, the children 
flying round to the end. 



Traditional Melody and Text 

transcribed by 

GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 



Harmonized by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



f 



Very fast. 



m 



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PIANO. 



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KeyG.Ua .,d :d 

\ . Bounce a - roun' 



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to 



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id-dv-um, 



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to 



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t, ,t, .t, 
id-dy-um, 



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lid . .,d :d 

Bounce a - roun' 



Pp 



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5756 



1 



m 
to 



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Long sum - mer day. 

S i 



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CUK&EN 



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8 



t 



:§=§: 



id .d ,d :d .d 

2. Go roun' de 'sem - bly 

3. Close up de 'sem - bly 

4. O - t>eii de 'sem - bly 



gg; 



§ 



w 



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m 



13 



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m .s 
to - day, 
to - day, 
to - day, 

— r^ 



iti .ti ,t t iti .ti 

Go roun' de 'sem - bly 

Close up de 'sem - bly 

O - pen de 'sem - bly 



w 



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to - day, 
to - day, 
to - day, 



¥ 



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|ld .d ,d :d 

Go roun' de 'sem 
Close up de 'sem 
O - pen de 'sem 



.d 

bly 
bly 
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\m . s 
to - day 
to - day 
to - day 



r 

Long 
Long 
Long 



:t, 

sum 
sum 
sum 



• t, 
mer 

mer 
mer 



i^n 



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day. Repeat V.l. 
day. D.S.for V.4. 
day. Repeat V.lalfine. 






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5756 



CHP5X-KN 



14 



COME, MAH LITTLE DARLIN. 

Southern Folk-tune. 



A circle is formed with one child in the centre. All join hands and walk round singing. At the words 
Rise up an! choose de one dat's suitable to yo' mi n'" the circle stands still and the child in the centre 
chooses a partner. After curtseying or bowing (if a boy) the chosen child takes the place in the cen- 
tre and the game continues , 



Traditional Melody and Text 
transcribed by 

GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 



Harmonized by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



VOICE. 



PIANO. 



Moderato. 



i 



espressivo. 



£ 



Key G.J I s 

Come, 



:— .8 In 
m ah lit 



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me, 



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take 



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walk 



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where 



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all 

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5756 



CUK&EN 



15 



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grow. 



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Dere are sweet 



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ClIK^KN 



16 



FLY ROUN'. 

Southern Folk-tune. 



Children form a circle, no one in centre. They then join hands and go dancing round while singing. At the 
words Honor yo' partner; make yo' obedient" (obeisance) all stop and let go hands, girls curtsey and boys 
bow, first to the one on the right and then to the one on the left, then all join hands agai?i and go flying 
round until the end of the song. 



Traditional Melody and Text 
transcribed by 
GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 



Harmonized by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



Fast. 



%- 



I 



VOICE. 



f 



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fera 



ggg 



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Key D. lit .8 : - .t 

Fly 'roun', fly 



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lid' .d' -.1 .d' It .s 

'roun', young la - dies, fly 'roun', 



.P Id 
fly 'roun', 



t .s :- .t I d" .d" :1 .d" ! 
Fly 'roun', fly 'roun', young la - dies, 



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fly 'roun 1 . 



lit .8 

fly 'roun', 



I pi , pi .pi :pi .pi 
If yo' can't fly I'll 



If .f :f 

fly my - self 



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5756 



CUF&'EN 



17 




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Simplified Accompaniment. 



(Prelude.) 



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5756 



cuk^-en 



18 



THE NEEDLES EYE 

Southern Folk-tune. 



Circle is formed with one child in the centre. Children walk round holding hands and singing. At the 
words Kiss huh quick an' let huh go" the one in the centre chooses a partner, to whom she curtseys and who 
curtseys (or bows if a boy) to her and takes the place in the centre. 



Traditional Melody and Text 

transcribed by 

GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 



Harmonized by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



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MAH HEART'S GONE AWAY TO LOOSIANA. 



Southern Folk-tune. 



Circle is formed with one in centre. The children walk round singing the entire song. At the end all 
stand still and the one in the centre chooses a partner to whom she curtseys and who curtseys in return 
and takes her place in the centre. The ga,me is then repeated. 

Traditional Melody and Text 

transcribed by Harmonized by 

GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



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CUR8BN 



22 



TURN, CINNAMON, TURN. 

Florida Folk-singing Game. 



This game is really a dance, and is played as follows. The boys first of all choose partners. All stand 
in two lines, partners facing each other- as if they were about to dance the Virginia Reel {or Sir Roger 
de Coverley), as, indeed, they are to all intents and purposes. At the commencement of the song the first 
boy takes his partner by the hand and leads her to the bottom of the line. They then cross, the boy being at 
the top of the girls' line and the girl being at the top of the boys' line. While the others are singing 
That lady's a-rocking her sugar lu?np" they go down the line swinging each player and themselves in suc- 
cession. When they have finished swinging or" turning" all the players in the line they take their places 
at the bottom, the game proceeding with the couple next in order and so on to the end. 



Traditional Folk-singing Game. 
Collected by LOUISE CLARKE -PRYNELLE. 
for HENRY E.KREHBIEL. 



Harmonized by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



VOICE. 



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From Games ar.d Songs of American Children, composed and compiled by William Wells Newell. 
Copyright, 1883, 1903, by Harper and Brothers. Copyright, 1911 , by Robert B.Stone. 



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CURg EN 



24 



KING AND QUEEN. 

Florida Folk- singing Game. 



This is an -unusually elaborate game, combining features of the Virginia Reel" and Sir Roger de Cover- 
ley" and the most salient element of the love games— that is, the hissing. 

The boys select their partners as they would for a dance and thus paired promenade as in a "school 
procession',' singing:— 

Walking on the green grass. 

Walking side by side, 
Walking with a pretty girl, 
She shall be my bride. 

Here the procession resolves itself into a ring, girls and boys alternating. The music is then repeated , 
all singing: — 

And now we form a round ring, 

The girls are by our sides, 
Dancing with the pretty girls 
Who shall be our brides! 

The ring keeps moving during the singing of this stanza, but at the end breaks into two lines, one of 
girls, the other of boys, facing each other as for a reel. The song is then resumed, and the following ac- 
tions are performed by the couple at the t&p of the lines, who are for the lime being King and Queen. 

And now the King upon the green, 
Shall choose a girl to be his Queen; 
Shall lead her out his bride to be, 

And kiss her one, two, three. 
Now take her by the hand, this Queen, 
And swing her round and round the green. 

Having thus called out, saluted, and swung his partner, the boy begins with the second girl and thence 
down the line, swinging each girl dancer in turn, his example being followed by his partner with the boys. 

and Oh! now we will go around the ring, 

And everyone we'll swing. 
swing the King and swing the Queen, 
O swing them round and round the green 
swing the King and swing the Queen 

swing them round the green. 

These lines are sung over and over again if necessary until all the dancers have been swung. Thereupon 
the King and Queen take their places at the foot of the lines and become the willing subjects of the next 
couple. The song is repeated from the words "And now the King upon the green" until all the couples have 
played at royalty, when the promenade is resumed, and the game started over again, generally with a change 
of partners. 



Traditional Folk-singing Game. 

Collected by LOUISE CLARKE-PRYNELLE. 

for HENRY E.KREHBIEL. 

{Optional Frelude) 

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From Games and Songs of American Children, composed and compiled by William Wells Newell. 
Copyright, 1883, 1903, by Harper and Brothers. Copyright, 1911, by Robert B.Stone. 



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Key F. i. s, Id .m :8 .d' It :1 

_ Walk - ing on the green grass, 

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— Walk -ing side by side, 
The girls are by our sides; 




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5756 



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CUFWEN 



IVE LOST A PARTNER 



27 



Florida Folk-singing Game. 



This game seems to be a variant of "Happy is the Miller'.' To play it, an odd number of players is required . 
The odd player, or boy, takes his place in the ring, which in this instance is double, partners walking arm 
in arm, the girls forming the inner circle. At the word "darling" each boy seizes the arm, of the girl imme- 
diately in front of him,, and during the scramble the player in the centre tries to secure a partner. If 
successful, there will of course be another partnerless player, who try s to supply his itant during the next 
turn. The ' Crackers" sing the following additional verses to fit each phase of the game.* 

Traditional Folk- singing Game. 
Collected by LOUISE CLARKE-PRYNELLE. Harmonized by 

for HENRY E. KREHBIEL. HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



VOICE. 



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la, She's better than the oth-er one, turn 



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I'll get an-oth-er one, 
bet-ter than the oth-er one, 



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tum-tum-ti- lu - 
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tum-ti-lu - la, 

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From Games and Songs of American Children , composed and compiled by William Wells Newell. 
5756 Copyright 1883. 1908. by Harper and Brothers. Copyright. 1911, by Robert B Stone. 



CUF^TN 



28 

LA BASTRINGUE. 

Old French-Canadian Folk-singing Game. 

A circle is formed with two children in the centre, one of whom is the Cavalier and the other the Maiden. 
The children hold hands and walk round singing the first verse. The Cavalier also sings a?id bows impres- 
sively several times, his hand upon his heart, while the Maiden curtseys in turn. At the words ^Suppliant 
here am I bending the knee" the circle stands still and the boy kneels in a-n imploring attitude The Maiden 
then sings the second verse, while making disconsolate gestures toward her feet. The third verse is a repeti- 
tion of the first in song and action. At its close the Maiden joins the circle; the Cavalier bows low, then 
chooses another maiden, who curtseys and is escorted to the centre, and the game proceeds. 

"La Bastringue" is the name in Northern France given to a ball among the peasants, which takes place in a tav- 
ern, where a fiddle or any other instrument is used to supply the music. Thus "La Bastringue',' which was 
brought three hundred years ago to Canada, has not only retained its name as a dance, but has developed into a 
singing -game in which the children delight. 



Melody and Text transcribed by 
ALICE LA MOTHE. 



Harmonization and English Text by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



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1. Mad 
1. Fair 



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e - moi - selle, vou - lez - vous 
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zel. wilt thou dance 



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- e - moi - selle, vou - lez - vous dan - ser 

dam - o - zel, wilt thou dance with me? 




5756 



pronounced Bas- strahng-u(r). 



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How should a bare -foot - ed 



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32 



l'hirondelle. 

{the swallow.) 

Old French- Canadian Folk-singing Game. 



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This game is very similar to Drop the Handkerchief'.' A circle is formed, with one child (the Swallow) 
outside. The children hold hands and walk round singing, while the Swallow runs quickly round the outside 
and drops a handkerchief behind any child that he or she chooses. Hach child is on the watch, and as soon 
as the handkerchief is found at his feet, picks it up and runs after the Swallow, who usually mafiages to 
get to the gap left in the circle before the pursuer catches him. If caught, he in turn, becomes the Swallow. 



Traditional Melody and Text 

transcribed by 

GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 



Harmonization and English Text by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



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ClIRA EN 



34 IL nY a qu'un seul dieu. 

(there is one great GOD.) 

Old French-Canadian Folk-singing Game. 

The children form a circle and, holding hands, walk round, singing the first five verses. At the close of 
the fifth verse they drop hands, and at the commencement of the sixth verse (the first part of which is 
sung very slowly and impressively) each child makes a dignified bow towards the centre of the circle, 
then in turn to the right— and left— hand neighbour. At the beginning of the seventh verse the children 
again join hands and walk round v>hile singing the rejnainder of the verses. 



Traditional Melody and Text transcribed by 
GRACE CLEVELAND PORTER. 

Allegro. 

4 

VOICE 



Harmonization and English Text by 
HARVEY WORTHINGTON LOOMIS. 



PIANO 




5756 



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quatre É - van - gé - lists, 




















cinq Livres en Moise, 




















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The singers will notice that after verse 5, they must go on to the separate music for verse 6, and this verse 6 must 

also be interpolated in all succeeding verses. The phrase indicated by the note"'beginning with 
3rd stanza"is cumulative as in ''The house that Jack built," that is. it must be sung over in 
5756 backward order, ending with the first verse at each repetition. 



CURjgEN 



PRESS AND PERSONAL OPINIONS. 



Westminster Gazette. 

Traditional Negro Singing-games were one of the 
features of a remarkable recital which Miss Porter 
gave at the Queen's Hall a few days ago. Miss 
Porter undoubtedly has the gift for holding both 
children and grown-ups spell-bound with tales, yarns, 
and poems that come bubbling up to the surface from 
an apparently inexhaustible supply. The games are 
really quite charming. I looked into the Espérance 
Club the other evening and found the children there 
hugely enjoying them. If they are not judges of what 
a singing-game should be nobody is, and these they 
have taken to from the start. 

The Daily News and Leader. 

The most arresting item perhaps was the game of 
" I'm walking on the Levee." It was a sheer delight 
to watch the tiny performers. Another effective piece 
was " Peep, squirrel." Miss Porter may be con- 
gratulated on the happy idea of gathering these songs 
and dances and arranging and presenting them with 
such success. 

Pall Mall Gazette. 

The negro folk-singing games, played for the first 
time in Europe, were demonstrated in a charming 
manner by the Espérance Guild of Morris Dancers. 

T.P.'s Weekly. 

The recital was a success. Miss Cleveland Porter's 
knowledge, both of the Southern States and of the 
folk-lore of Canada, gives to her work a wide range. 
. . . But where she undoubtedly added to the 
repertory of London is in the negro-singing games. 
"La .Bastringue," a French-Canadian singing-game, is 
very distinctive, while, curiously enough, one or two of 
the negro games were nearly akin to some of our own. 

The Morning Post. 

Mammy Mary's ways were described with a keen 
sense of their humorous side. The games were acted, 
sung, and danced with zest and spontaneity by a 
group of children. 

London Musical Courier. 

A new note has been struck in the London musical 
world by Miss Grace Cleveland Porter, who is pro- 
viding our public with two distinctive and very 
attractive forms of folk-lore and folk-song. A group 
of children from Miss Mary Neal's Espérance Guild 
of Morris Dancers demonstrated the folk-singing 
games. The evident enjoyment of the children was 
most apparent, as was also the enthusiasm of the 
audience. " Walkin' on the Levee" had to be 
repeated, and an especially interesting feature was 
" La Bastringue," a charming French-Canadian folk 
singing-game. In bringing something new and of 
intrinsic value to London, Miss Porter has won the 
gratitude of all who have heard her. 



The Onlooker. 

I only hope the Espérance Morris Dancers, who 
performed the singing-games in London for the first 
time, enjoyed them as much as we did, for they were 
deliciously coy, charmingly natural, and they acted, 
as well as danced them, to perfection. One could 
hardly imagine that these quaint little figures, some 
dressed in bright-hued frocks and white sun-bonnets, 
and others in smocks and soft felt hats, could be mere 
children, so wonderfully did they enter into the 
' spirit of this singing-game — miniature lovers, gay, 
sad, entreating, coquettish by turns. " The little 
black sheep am lonesome" was full of the pathos 
and comedy so often combined in the negro character. 
Miss Porter gives us the real thing — a glimpse of life 
such as it was in the plantations of the Southern 
States before the war — and hence her power to hold 
her audience enthralled, delighted, and only anxious 
to hear her again some day. 

F. Herbert Stead, M.A. 

(Warden of the Robert Browning Settlement). 

Here was a new thing in entertainments The 

effect was no small revelation to a British audience. 
The children were entranced ; their quaint fancies 
and dim longings were interpreted to them with a 
tenderness and a drollery irresistible. The older folk 
followed with deepening absorption of interest, their 
eyes often moist and shining ; and professional 
students of Froebel methods were glad to see their 
child-study illuminated and vivified by Miss Porter's 
dramatic art. It was a moving procession of child-lore 
and folk-lore that passed in music and word-picture 
and rhythmic gesture before our eyes. 

J. J. Fahie (Folk-lore Society). 

English audiences of the cultured sort are not as 
a rule very demonstrative, but yesterday their feelings 
were not restrained. You heard the clapping and the 
laughing, but you could not hear the whispered 
appreciations as I could. . . . From the first 
moment you caught the interest of the audience and 
carried it with you to the end of your Recital. 

Francis Frierson 

(Author of "Invincible Alliance.") 

Miss Porter left a delightful and memorable im- 
pression on the cultured and critical audience which 
greeted her first appearance at Small Queen's Hall. 

Alice Hegan Rice 

(Author of "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch"). 

It is not often that one finds the gift of mimicry 
linked to such tender understanding as Miss Grace 
Porter portrays in her songs and stories of the 
Southern negro. ... She tells her stories and 
sings her songs as simply as a child, but she leaves 
you with some whimsical, half humorous, half 
pathetic impression that you are not apt to forget. 



Many other appreciations, equally favourable, have been received. 



5756 



CURWEN'S ACTION-SONG BOOKS. 

Kindergarten Songs, Games, Plays, Stories, and Music. 



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BABIES' OWN SONG BOOK. Words and music by Louie Jesse. 

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CHING CHANG'S TEA SHOP, and other Games, Songs, and Hesitations. 

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COME, CHILDREN, SING. Words and music by Kate T. Sixer. 

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DAISIES AND THE BREEZES, THE. By L. Ormiston Chant. A 

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EDINBURGH ACTION SONGS. By Miss and Mr. Moffat. Both 

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ENGLISH VILLAGE. By Foxwbll and Jackiian. Both notations, 

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FARMYARD, THE, and other Zoological Action Songs. Illustrated 

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FRISE'S INFANT SONGS. Words and music by Jesse Frise. Con- 
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«AMES FROM SOUTH KENSINGTON. By Edith M. J. Lloyd. 

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GEMS FOR THE KINDERGARTEN. By Annie B. Studlby. Both 

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BAY-TIME ACTION SONGS. By Mrs. Ormiston Chant. Both 
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MRS. WALKER'S ACTION SONGS AND GAMES for Young ChUdri 

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OMNIBUS RIDE, THE, and other Games (or Schools. By E. Colli 

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notations, if-. 
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YORKSHIRE KINDERGARTEN GAMES. By A, H. Graham. B 
nota t ion s, if-. 



Kindargartsn Music Catsloerus assit post frse on sppHestton. 

LONDON: J. CUR WEN & SONS Lltt, 24 BERNEES STREET. W. 



S10/5.U 






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Boston Public Library 
Central Library, Copley Square 

Division of 
Reference and Research Services 

Music Department 



The Date Due Card in the pocket indi- 
cates the date on or before which this 
book should be returned to the Library. 

Please do not remove cards from this 
pocket. 



iLi;